Author Archives: Roy Goodacre

A year in review: 2022

Our research group has worked very hard work over the last year, and it’s been nice to have such a great team as part of the Laboratory for Bioanalytical Spectroscopy in the CMR.

It is fair to say that 2022 has been another strange year thanks to COVID-19.  But it is good to think that this year we are starting to get back to normal and let’s hope it continues for 2023.

In 2022 we welcomed Dakshat as a postdoc in Easter, Harriet and Joe as new PhD students in October, and very recently in December Becky as a MPhil student.  We also welcomed Jackie and her administrative support for the group is brilliant.  We also said goodbye to Amanda and wish her all the very best within her new faculty role as Executive Officer / PA to the Director of Student Experience and Enhancement.

We had a successfully year with many research outputs, and in particular the highlights I’d like to make are that:

  • Iva had her first paper published in Metabolomics on using metabolomics of serum from COVID-19 patients for assessing disease severity and outcome.
  • Tia had her first paper published in Frontiers of Microbiology on the development of metabolic fingerprint analysis using FT-IR spectroscopy of recombinant protein production in E. coli.
  • Shwan had a paper published in RSC’s Chemical Science on Raman and infrared spectroscopy can be combined simultaneously to study bacterial infections at the single cell level.

These all featured in the Faculty’s First Paper Campaign – Well done all!

In other news on publications with Rick we had some successes with work from mQACC (Metabolomics Quality Assurance and Quality Control Consortium) with a couple of nice reviews/white papers being published in Metabolomics:

We had several great successes:

We’ve been fortunate and let’s also hope this continues in 2023.

Lastly Howbeer and I hosted Spring SciX which went off really well, despite the high levels of COVID in the UK at that time. I’d like to personally thank Howbeer for his hard work and dedication on this. He certainly did all the heavy lifting and made the meeting one that we can all be very proud of as it showcased Liverpool in a really nice way.

Wishing you all the very best for a peaceful, productive and prosperous new year.

Shwan – my first paper

Shwan’s open access paper tackles the important area of sepsis where Raman and infrared spectroscopy can be combined simultaneously to study bacterial infections at the single cell level.

This is a really nice collaboration with our colleagues Enitan, Rachel and Christopher in the Department of Clinical Infection, Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Liverpool.

Published in the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Chemical Science Shwan’s joint first paper features in our Health and Life Science faculty’s #MyFirstPaper campaign. Find out more here.

Tai – My First Paper

Tai’s open access paper on metabolic fingerprint analysis of recombinant protein production in E. coli has recently been published. This is a really nice collaboration with our colleagues Naheed and Joseph in the University of Aberystwyth.
Published in Frontiers in Microbiology Tai’s paper features in our Health and Life Science faculty’s #MyFirstPaper campaign. Find out more here

Tai’s very happy with her paper!

Well done Tai! This is really nice work.

Iva – My First Paper

Iva’s open access paper on the metabolomics of serum from COVID-19 patients for assessing disease severity and outcome that was published in Metabolomics features in our Health and Life Science faculty’s #MyFirstPaper campaign. Find out more here.

Well done Iva! This will be her first of many impactful studies.

Analytical Methods Cover

Delighted that Mehrvash and Yun’s paper on “Rapid detection and quantification of the adulteration of orange juice with grapefruit juice using Handheld Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis” has been published in Analytical Methods and features in the front cover. Brilliant artwork from Howbeer.

Detecting food adulteration has always been an important task for food safety, especially when grapefruit is the adulterant as components in the juice have undesired interactions with many medicines. In this study we employed a handheld Raman device to detect and to quantify the adulteration of orange juices with grapefruit juices

Spring SciX Conference Report 2022

Just before Easter in the University of Liverpool we hosted the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACSS) Spring SciX 2022 Conference.
This was a 3-day international conference in which ECRs present their research with the aim of establishing career mentors for them.
Please read the Spring SciX Conference Report 2022 by Dan, Sara and Tai.